An Expected Death

Even though a death may be expected, nothing prepares you for the emotional shock of losing a loved one.

 

The first thing to remember is that we are here to help, if at any time you are unsure what to do, or if you feel your circumstances differ from the below, please contact us. You do not need to have registered the death to ask us for advice or start discussing funeral arrangements.

 

Please note that if the deceased suffered from an industrial disease, the death will always be referred to the coroner by the GP. See our Sudden Death page.

 

An expected death has occurred at a hospital.

Most hospitals have their own Mortuary, and so immediate removal of the deceased is not required, if this is not the case, the hospital will inform us of the death and we will make arrangements to move the deceased to our Chapel of Rest.

 

All hospitals have a Bereavement Services team, you should speak to them to determine when the Cause of Death Certificate will be ready to collect. Once you know when this can be collected, you can contact your local registrar to arrange an appointment to register the death. You will need to take the Cause of Death Certificate to the Registrar.

 

Some hospitals have an in house registrar, in which case the Bereavement Services team can book an appointment for you and give the certificate directly to the registrar.

 

You can contact us whenever you are ready.

 

An expected death has occurred at a hospice.

Most hospices have their own Mortuary, and so immediate removal of the deceased is not required, if this is not the case, the hospice will inform us of the death and we will make arrangements to move the deceased to our Chapel of Rest.

 

The hospice will let you know when the Cause of Death Certificate will be ready to collect, this may be from them or the local GP's office depending upon their arrangements. Once you know when this can be collected, you can contact your local registrar to arrange an appointment to register the death. You will need to take the Cause of Death Certificate to the Registrar.

 

You can contact us whenever you are ready.

 

An expected death occurred at a care home.

The home will contact us to make arrangements for the deceased to be moved to our Chapel of Rest.

 

The home will also inform the GP of the deceased that they have passed away, who will produce the Cause of Death Certificate. You should make contact with the GP surgery directly to find out when the Cause of Death Certificate will be ready to collect. Once you know when this can be collected, you can contact your local registrar to arrange an appointment to register the death. You will need to take the Cause of Death Certificate to the Registrar.

 

You can contact us whenever you are ready.

 

An expected death occurred at home.

If it is during surgery hours you can contact the deceased's regular GP, in most cases the GP will attend to certify the death at the earliest opportunity. If you are comfortable doing so, the GP may ask you to perform certain tasks to confirm that death has occurred, if they are satisfied that the person has died, it is not essential they attend, although most still will.

 

If it is out of surgery hours, you can contact the out-of-hours doctors, who will do the same as a GP, though they may not attend in person.

 

If the deceased is under the care of district nurses, they are able to confirm that the death has occurred.

 

Once the above has happened, please contact us to make arrangements for us to move the deceased to our Chapel of Rest.

Important Note.

From April 2019, there will be a gradual nationwide roll-out of a new Medical Examiner system that will examine all deaths.

This system will change the way in which the Cause of Death Certificate is issued, however, it is not yet in operation in our local area, and as such we are not yet publishing information about it to avoid confusion.

This information will be updated when appropriate, however, if you do encounter this system away from the local area, please contact us for more information.

How do I register a death?

(Specific to during Coronavirus)

Find your local Registry Office.

 

In the event that the coroner is involved, please see our Sudden Death page.

 

The attending doctor will email the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death directly to the Register Office, once you know it has been sent, please call the Register Office to arrange a telephone appointment.

 

The following people are permitted to Register a death:

  • A relative.

  • Someone present at the death.

  • An administrator from the hospital.

  • The person making funeral arrangements.

  • Funeral Director (where the above is not possible).

 

During the registration call, it is handy to have the following with you, although none of these are essential:

  • Birth certificate.

  • Council Tax bill.

  • Driving licence.

  • Marriage or civil partnership certificate.

  • NHS medical card.

  • Passport.

  • Proof of address (eg utility bill).

 

You will need to provide the following information to the Registrar:

  • The person’s full name at the time of death.

  • Any names previously used, eg maiden name.

  • The person’s date and place of birth.

  • Their last address.

  • Their occupation.

  • The full name, date of birth and occupation of a surviving or late spouse or civil partner.

  • Whether they were getting a State Pension or any other benefits.

 

The Registrar will send you:

  • As many copies of the Death Certificate as you think you will need (currently £11 each).

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We Are

MOVERS & SHAKERS

Members of The National Association of Funeral Directors
Members of The Society of Allied and Independent Funeral Directors

Head Office:

J G Fielder & Son

48-50 Clarence Street

York

YO31 7EW (View Map)

Tel: 01904 654460

Fax: 01904 637413

Email: enquiries@jgfielderandson.co.uk

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